College of Sciences

We offer rigorous bachelor, master's, and Ph. D. programs with flexibility for students to tailor their degrees toward specific career goals.

College of Sciences

Helping students build empowering foundations in the sciences and mathematics.

Transporting students to the frontiers of human knowledge and inviting them to push its boundaries.

Educating and preparing the next generation of scientists who will create the technologies of the future.

Statue of Einstein on Georgia Tech campusWhy study sciences and mathematics?

  • You possess a curious mind that likes to investigate.
  • You want to make discoveries that can change how we see the world.
  • You plan to attend a top-ranked graduate or professional school.
  • You intend to apply scientific discoveries to solving real-world problems.
Atlanta Skyline and Tech Tower

Why Georgia Tech?

To get a rigorous education that you can tailor to your interests.

To learn from and train with the top professors in your chosen field.

To experience the excitement of discovery in state-of-the-art facilities.

To live in a vibrant, connected community in one of the most tech-savvy cities in the U.S.—Atlanta.

Latest News From the College of Sciences

  • Spray-on Electric Rainbows: Making Safer Electrochromic Inks

    A flick of a switch, and electrochromic films change their colors. Now they can be applied more safely and more commonly thanks to an innovative chemical process that makes them water soluble. They can be sprayed and printed, instead of being confined behind safety implements to handle volatile and toxic fumes. 

  • Strengthening Connections with Peking University

    Nine Peking University students learned how Georgia Tech researchers study air quality and climate science during the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences' second summer workshop for PKU undergraduates. 

  • Skewing the Aim of Targeted Cancer Therapies

    The aim of targeted gene-based cancer therapies could be skewed from the start, more often than not. The widespread practice of using elevated RNA levels to pick cancer drug targets could be inaccurate two-thirds of the time. The widely assumed correlation between those RNA levels and the levels of cancerous protein molecules, the drugs' actual targets, proved incorrect 62% of the time in a new study in ovarian cancer cells.

  • Searching for Science in the Solar Darkness

    For hundreds of years, scientists and historians have used solar eclipses to learn more about the nature of the sun and how it effects Earth. That will continue on Aug. 21, 2017, with Georgia Tech researchers joining the search for answers as the path of a total solar eclipse stretches across the U.S. 

  • How to Watch the Solar Eclipse at Georgia Tech

    The skies over Georgia Tech will be at 97 percent darkness during the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse. Watfching the spectacle will require special eclipse-viewin glasses, but you'll also want to notice the changes in the environment around you as the skies get darker during this rare celestial event.

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