News Archive

  • Replacing Textbooks with Websites

    A better way to teach, a better way to learn

    Eliminating textbooks in favor of customized websites is win-win for students and faculty.

    Textbooks are the bane of students. Their cost has increased significantly over the past decade. In 2010, the average price of a textbook was $133. The cost of science and mathematics tomes averages even higher. Beyond the financial drain, textbooks are often bloated with information that will not and cannot be covered during the one or two semesters they are intended to be used. For students and professors alike, there’s got to be a better way. Ever inventive and industrious, academics in the School of Biological Sciences have found a solution: replace textbooks with custom-built websites.

  • The Electric Sands of Titan

    The grains that cover Saturn’s moon act like clingy packing peanuts

    Particles that cover the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, are “electrically charged.”

    Experiments suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, are “electrically charged.” When the wind blows hard enough (approximately 15 mph), Titan’s non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion referred to as saltation. As they collide, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rubbing against your hair, and clump together in a way not observed for sand dune grains on Earth — they become resistant to further motion. They attach to other hydrocarbon substances, much like packing peanuts used in shipping boxes here on Earth.

  • Peter Webster Elected Honorary Fellow of U.K. Meteorological Society

    The atmospheric scientist joins British royalty, science community giants, and other luminaries by accepting the honor

    The atmospheric scientist joins British royalty, science community giants, and other luminaries by accepting the honor

    The atmospheric scientist joins British royalty, science community giants, and other luminaries by accepting the honor

  • Faculty-Teacher Duo Combines Electrochemistry and Dance to Teach Engineering to High School Students

    Integration of arts and sciences drives creation of new lesson plans

    Through the PRIME Research Experiences for Teachers Program, Hatzell and Okoh have partnered to create an innovative way to teach high school students electrochemistry techniques for water purification.

    Through the PRIME Research Experiences for Teachers Program, Hatzell and Okoh have partnered to create an innovative way to teach high school students electrochemistry techniques for water purification.

  • Dunn Institute Chair To Support Two Professorships

    School of Physics' Dan Goldman, Deirdre Shoemaker split endowment

    Professorships empower School of Physics faculty to tackle high-risk, high-reward questions.

    The donor for Dunn Family Institute Chair at Georgia Tech requested that the inaugural award be in the School of Physics. College of Sciences Dean Paul Goldbart had an idea: Split the endowment between two physics faculty members.

  • NASA Chooses Georgia Tech For New Solar System Research Project

    Multidisciplinary Team Will Study How to Protect Astronauts from Radiation

    A Georgia Tech-led research project is one of four chosen by NASA to broaden knowledge of the Solar System.

    NASA has announced that School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor Thomas Orlando’s team – Radiation Effect on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces (REVEALS) – is one of four chosen by the space agency for inclusion in SSERVI – the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute.

  • Tech Researchers Suggest Better Route to FDA-Approved Drugs

    Microbes could make production more efficient

    A new study proposes more microbial engineering for drugs based on plant alkaloids.

    Advances in metabolic engineering of microbes could lead to cheaper, faster production of drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). That’s the conclusion of a study published recently by Amy Ehrenworth, a Ph.D. student, and Pamela Peralta-Yahya, an assistant professor and Ehrenworth’s advisor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

     

  • Empathy from the Sick May be Critical to Halting Disease Outbreaks

    A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks.

    A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That’s a conclusion from researchers who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbreak of influenza – or other illness – affects the progress of the disease, including how rapidly the outbreak dies out. 

  • China's Severe Winter Haze Tied to Climate Change

    China's severe winter air pollution problems may be worsened by changes in atmospheric circulation prompted by climate change.

    China's severe winter air pollution problems may be worsened by changes in atmospheric circulation prompted by Arctic sea ice loss and increased Eurasian snowfall – both caused by global climate change.

  • From the Butterfly's Wing to the Tornado: Predicting Turbulence

    Scientists predict future behavior of turbulent fluid flow

    Remember the adage about a flapping butterfly's wing triggering a tornado? Physicists are getting better at predicting the wiles of turbulence.

    Will we even ever know if a flapping butterfly wing can trigger a tornado a continent away? Chaos theory says calculating and predicting turbulence must be impossible. But physicists are latching onto turbulent patterns with digital optics and math, and their resulting forecasts closely jibe with actual turbulent flows. Their work offers possible paths into growing mounds of weather and climate data to make better use of them.