News Archive

  • For Tech’s Schuster, American Chemical Society honors come in threes

    Former College of Sciences dean named to 2017 class of ACS Fellows

    Gary B. Schuster, School of Chemistry professor and former College of Sciences dean, is named to the 2017 class of the American Chemical Society Fellows Program.

    He has served as interim Georgia Tech president, he was the dean of the College of Sciences for 12 years, and he's already received two American Chemical Society awards. Now Gary B. Schuster is getting another honor; he's been named to the 2017 class of ACS Fellows.

  • Georgia Tech’s AMP-IT-UP Video Recognized at National Science Foundation Showcase

    Video highlights CEISMC program that gets students excited about STEM

    Georgia Tech’s AMP-IT-UP video received a Facilitators’ Choice award at the 2017 NSF STEM for All Video Showcase: Research & Design for Impact.

    Georgia Tech participated in the 2017 NSF STEM for All Video Showcase: Research & Design for Impact. Its submission highlighted the AMP-IT-UP NSF Math and Science Partnership.

  • Mindfulness is in the Moment in New Book “Presence”

    Tech’s Paul Verhaeghen examines the science of mindfulness-based meditation

    School of Psychology professor Paul Verhaeghen's new book focuses on whether mindfulness can benefit the body and mind.

    Does science back up the claims that mindfulness-based meditation can boost health, wellness and self-esteem? School of Psychology professor Paul Verhaeghen's new book, "Presence," examines the evidence. 

  • Drug Design Strategy Boosts the Odds Against Resistance Development

    A new drug design strategy could boost the odds against developing antibiotic resistance.

    A new rational drug design technique that uses a powerful computer algorithm to identify molecules that target different receptor sites on key cellular proteins could provide a new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistance, potentially tipping the odds against the bugs. 

  • Wildfires Pollute Much More Than Previously Thought

    Data from flights through wildfire plumes reveal three times the officially noted levels for fine particles

    Wildfires are major polluters. Their plumes are three times as dense with aerosol-forming fine particles as previously believed. For the first time, researchers have flown an orchestra of modern instruments through brutishly turbulent wildfire plumes to measure emissions in real time. A study led by Georgia Tech has also exposed other toxins, some never before measured.

  • Georgia Student Inventors Shine in National Competition

    Winners came through K-12 InVenture Challenge @ Georgia Tech

    Young inventors from Georgia win multiple awards at the National Invention Convention and Entrepreneurship Expo (NICEE).

    Three young inventors from the state of Georgia won major awards at  the 2017 National Invention Convention and Entrepreneurship Expo (NICEE), held on June 1-3, 2017, United States Patent and Trademark Office, Alexandria, VA.

  • Mind Over Muscles: How the Brain Hinders Individual Muscle Control

    A new study explores the role of "common drive" when controlling muscles.

    A new study explores the role of "common drive" when controlling muscles.

  • Rattling DNA Hustles Transcribers to Targets

    DNA is the boss when it comes to the movement of molecules through its dense curls, beating out all other sources of motion.

    "DNA is a bully." That's how researcher Jeffrey Skolnick sums up the dominant power of DNA motion among the forces acting upon transcription factors as they move through DNA's winding thickets to their target sites. He and Edmond Chow have programmed a very large, unique simulation that tests and corroborates the hypothesis.

  • The Next Frontiers in Space

    How soon will astronauts be visiting Mars? It depends.

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Associate Professor James Wray urges funding for Mars exploration

    A new report, written by The Planetary Society, says the clock is ticking for exploration on Mars. Quickly. As the group notes, NASA only has one mission in development for the Red Planet — the Mars 2020 Rover. More is needed, according to the Society, particularly an updated orbiter and a rover that can land and retrieve samples dug up by the 2020 robot. James Wray in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is a science team member on most of NASA and the European Space Agency’s missions currently active on Mars.

  • Cobb and Toktay Take Carbon Reduction Challenge from Class to Co-op

    Partnership will expand student participation

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Kim Cobb’s successful Carbon Reduction Challenge class will be expanded to enable students participating in an internship or co-op to plan and implement a carbon reduction project with their employers.

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Kim Cobb program is collaborating with College of Business Professor Beril Toktay to extend the reach of the Carbon Reduction Challenge. Toktay is the faculty director of the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business.