News Archive

  • Math Madness at Georgia Tech

    Students from 30 schools joined the 2017 High School Math Competition

    College basketball has March Madness. The College of Sciences has Math Madness – in April.

    The competition comprised four exams covering algebra, geometry, combinatorics, number theory, and basic calculus. Volunteer Georgia Tech faculty, staff, and students, led by School of Mathematics Professor and Chair Rachel Kuske, hosted the event.

  • The Science of Defecation Could Produce Better Medicine for Constipation

    All mammals "go" in the same amount of time, and the new findings could lead to medical advances.

    A new study led by researchers in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering finds that all mammals, from humans to elephants to cats, defecate in the same amount of time: about 12 seconds. That’s despite the fact that the length of their rectums can vary widely. For instance, an elephant’s is 10 times the length of a cat’s (40 centimeters vs. four).

    The study suggests that the time is consistent because of mucus. The substance covering the the large intestine is very thin for small animals and much thicker for larger ones. According to the paper, mucus allows feces to move through the intestine “like a sled sliding through a chute.”

  • Tech’s Official in D.C. on Strategy for Science, Education Funding

    Robert Knotts: The federal budget is “in a tough place”

    Georgia Tech's representative in D.C. responds to concerns about federal science funding.

    Robert Knotts, director of federal relations for Georgia Tech's Office of Government and Community Relations, talks strategy for dealing with the new administration and funding of academic science research.

  • Undergraduate Research Mentor Prize Launched in School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    New award is funded by Anita and Gary Schuster

    An award to recognize sustained engagement of graduate students and postdoctoral associates as undergraduate research mentors has been established in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

    An award to recognize sustained engagement of graduate students and postdoctoral associates as undergraduate research mentors has been established in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The new award is funded by Gary B. Schuster and his wife, Anita. Gary Schuster is Vassar Woolley Professor Emeritus and Regents Professor in the College of Sciences. He is the 2017 recipient of Georgia Tech’s highest faculty honor, the Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award

  • “First Arrival” Hypothesis in Darwin’s Finches Gets Some Caveats

    Researchers have extended the hypothesis for how early arriving species gain an ecosystem advantage through adaptive radiation.

    Being first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new study testing the importance of “first arrival” in controlling adaptive radiation of species, a hypothesis famously proposed for “Darwin’s Finches,” birds from the Galapagos Islands that were first brought to scientific attention by the famous naturalist.

  • Get to Know the School of Math Prof: Rachel Kuske

    Advice to freshmen math majors: Explore different areas of mathematics

    To celebrate Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month, we're featuring the math professors of Georgia Tech.

    To celebrate Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month, we're featuring the math professors of Georgia Tech. Rachel Kuske is the chair of the School of Mathematics. She joined Georgia Tech in January 2017.

  • College of Sciences Celebrates Spring 2017 Student Awardees

    Award winners combine academic excellence with undergraduate research and other experiential learning options

    As the 2016-17 school year winded down, 11 College of Sciences undergraduate students were among those reaping the rewards of consistently applying themselves to their education and taking advantage of the educational experiences Georgia Tech offers.

    Leading these years’ awardees is Charles M. Wang, who is graduating in May with a B.S. in Chemistry and Computer Science, as well as enough credits also for a degree in applied mathematics. Two honors match Wang’s two degrees: The College of Sciences has selected Wang to receive the Robert A. Pierotti Memorial Scholarship, and Georgia Tech has named Wang a co-recipient of the Love Family Foundation Scholarship.

  • Exosomes Have a Sense of Urgency

    New research from Dixon and Vannberg labs illuminate critical role of courier nanoparticles

    New research from Dixon and Vannberg labs illuminate critical role of courier nanoparticles

    New research from Dixon and Vannberg labs illuminate critical role of courier nanoparticles

  • Charles Wang Receives Love Family Foundation Scholarship

    Chemistry and computer science major will continue in mathematics

    Wang graduates with two B.S. degrees and enough credits for a third.

    Charles M. Wang, of Marietta, Georgia, has received the 2017 Love Family Foundation Scholarship. This award is the highest that Georgia Tech gives to a graduating senior. Wang graduates on May 6, 2017, with B.S. degrees in Chemistry and Computer Science and more mathematics credits than most math majors.

  • Joel Kostka on Microbes and Climate Change

    “Microbes intimately impact Earth's climate,” says the College of Sciences professor

    What can microorganisms teach us about climate change?

    What can microorganisms teach us about climate change? Plenty, because microbes respond, adapt, and evolve faster than other organisms. Scientists can discover how microorganisms will change because of global warming more quickly than is possible for complex organisms. Understanding how microbes respond to climate change will help predict its effects on other forms of life, including humans.