Physics

Einstein Was Correct (Again): Gravitational Waves Observed

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For the first time ever, a gravitational wave has been observed. A team of global researchers announced the finding on Thursday, February 11.
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College of Sciences Faculty, Postdocs and Student Researchers Play Crucial Role in Landmark Discovery of Gravitational Waves.

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Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years After Einstein’s Prediction
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Searching for Gravitational Waves: An Update

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A century after Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, the National Science Foundation (NSF) gathers scientists on Feb. 11 for an update on efforts to detect these elusive ripples in the cosmos.
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For this Nanocatalyst, One Atom Makes a Big Difference

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Researchers have explained why platinum nanoclusters of a specific size range facilitate the hydrogenation reaction used to produce ethane from ethylene.
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Combining experimental investigations and theoretical simulations, researchers have explained why platinum nanoclusters of a specific size range facilitate the hydrogenation reaction used to produce ethane from ethylene. The research offers new insights into the role of cluster shapes in catalyzing reactions at the nanoscale, and could help materials scientists optimize nanocatalysts for a broad class of other reactions.

Women in Physics Meet in Georgia Tech

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Close to 200 physics college students converged at Georgia Tech for the Conference of Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWIP) on Jan. 15-17, 2016.
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Close to 200 physics college students converged at Georgia Tech for the Conference of Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWIP) on Jan. 15-17, 2016. CUWIP is a program of the American Physical Society to support the professional growth of undergraduate women in physics. This year marks the first time Georgia Tech hosted the event. In welcoming conference attendees, Georgia Tech College of Sciences Dean Paul M.

The Coffee-Ring Effect and the Physics of Breakfast

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Inquiring Minds Public Lecture
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Professor Pablo Laguna, Chair of the Georgia Tech School of Physics receives the 2016 Bouchet Award from the American Physical Society

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Georgia Tech Physics School Chair and Professor Pablo Laguna has been selected as the American Physical Society's 2016 Edward A. Bouchet Award recipient, which recognizes a distinguished minority physicist who has made significant contributions to research.
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Georgia Tech Physics School Chair and Professor Pablo Laguna has been selected as the American Physical Society's 2016 Edward A. Bouchet Award recipient, which recognizes a distinguished minority physicist who has made significant contributions to research. He has been recognized for contributions to numerical relativity and astrophysics; in particular, on the simulation of colliding black holes.

Professor John Wise receives inaugural College of Sciences Eric R. Immel Award for Excellence in Teaching

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Congratulations to Professor John Wise for receiving the inaugural College of Sciences Eric R. Immel Award for Excellence in Teaching.
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Congratulations to Professor John Wise for receiving the inaugural College of Sciences Eric R. Immel Award for Excellence in Teaching. This award is named for the late Georgia Tech Professor of Mathematics Eric Immel, that recognizes exemplary teaching in foundational classes in the prior academic year to a junior faculty member.

HAWC captures evidence of powerful cosmic visitors

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In the shadow of Mexico’s tallest mountain, an array of 300 water-filled silver tanks is capturing the calling cards left by powerful visitors from our galaxy and beyond.
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In the shadow of Mexico’s tallest mountain, an array of 300 water-filled silver tanks is capturing the calling cards left by powerful visitors from our galaxy and beyond. The tanks are the most visible components of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), a one-of-its-kind facility designed to gather information about high-energy gamma rays entering the Earth’s atmosphere.

Snake robots learn to turn by following the lead of real sidewinders

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Researchers who develop snake-like robots have picked up a few tricks from real sidewinder rattlesnakes on how to make rapid and even sharp turns with their undulating, modular device.
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Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) who develop snake-like robots have picked up a few tricks from real sidewinder rattlesnakes on how to make rapid and even sharp turns with their undulating, modular device.

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