Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Looking at El Nino’s past to predict its future


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A new study shows how this climate system responds to various pressures, such as changes in carbon dioxide and ice cover, in one of the best models used to project future climate change.
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The El Niño Southern Oscillation is Earth’s main source of year-to-year climate variability, but its response to global warming remains highly uncertain.

Carbon soot particles, dust blamed for discoloring India’s Taj Mahal


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The Taj Mahal’s iconic marble dome and soaring minarets require regular cleaning to maintain their dazzling appearance, and scientists now know why.
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The Taj Mahal’s iconic marble dome and soaring minarets require regular cleaning to maintain their dazzling appearance, and scientists now know why. Researchers from the United States and India are pointing the finger at airborne carbon particles and dust for giving the gleaming white landmark a brownish cast.

Knowing the culprits in the discoloration is just the first step in cleaning up the Taj Mahal. Scientists now must determine where the particles are coming from to develop strategies for controlling them.

College of Sciences Teams Up with Science Teacher to Bring STEM Education to American Indian Reservations


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Middle school teacher Nicole Collins is working with Georgia Tech faculty to develop lesson plans that will be available to teachers across the country.
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By Hannah Ackermann and Drake Lee-Patterson

 
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Nicole Collins

New technology tracks tiniest pollutants in real time


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A team of six faculty members at the Georgia Institute of Technology has been awarded a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for air pollution research.
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Smog over Atlanta

2010 Chilean earthquake causes icequakes in Antarctica


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Study is the first to indicate that Antarctica is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes
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Seismic events aren’t rare occurrences on Antarctica, where sections of the frozen desert can experience hundreds of micro-earthquakes an hour due to ice deformation. Some scientists call them icequakes. But in March of 2010, the ice sheets in Antarctica vibrated a bit more than usual because of something more than 3,000 miles away: the 8.8-magnitude Chilean earthquake. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study published in Nature Geoscience is the first to indicate that Antarctica’s frozen ground is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes.

Greg Huey Named Chair of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences


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Appointment will be effective July 1, 2014
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High Levels of Molecular Chlorine Found in Arctic Atmosphere


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Scientists studying the atmosphere above Barrow, Alaska, have discovered unprecedented levels of molecular chlorine in the air, a new study reports.
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Evidence Found for Granite on Mars


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The findings suggest a much more geologically complex Mars than previously thought.
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Methane-Munching Microorganisms Meddle with Metals


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A pair of microbes on the ocean floor “eats” methane in a unique way, and a new study provides insights into their surprising nutritional requirements.
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Moving Iron in Antarctica


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New study on carbon dioxide absorption in Antarctic seas explores how iron is cylced in the region.
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