Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

2010 Chilean earthquake causes icequakes in Antarctica


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Study is the first to indicate that Antarctica is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes
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Seismic events aren’t rare occurrences on Antarctica, where sections of the frozen desert can experience hundreds of micro-earthquakes an hour due to ice deformation. Some scientists call them icequakes. But in March of 2010, the ice sheets in Antarctica vibrated a bit more than usual because of something more than 3,000 miles away: the 8.8-magnitude Chilean earthquake. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study published in Nature Geoscience is the first to indicate that Antarctica’s frozen ground is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes.

Greg Huey Named Chair of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences


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Appointment will be effective July 1, 2014
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High Levels of Molecular Chlorine Found in Arctic Atmosphere


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Scientists studying the atmosphere above Barrow, Alaska, have discovered unprecedented levels of molecular chlorine in the air, a new study reports.
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Evidence Found for Granite on Mars


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The findings suggest a much more geologically complex Mars than previously thought.
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Methane-Munching Microorganisms Meddle with Metals


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A pair of microbes on the ocean floor “eats” methane in a unique way, and a new study provides insights into their surprising nutritional requirements.
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Moving Iron in Antarctica


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New study on carbon dioxide absorption in Antarctic seas explores how iron is cylced in the region.
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Borneo Stalagmites Provide New View of Abrupt Climate Events Over 100,000 Years


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Climate records from cave stalagmites show that the western tropical Pacific responded differently to abrupt climate change events.

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Contact: John Toon

Hearing the Russian Meteor, in America


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How powerful was February’s meteor that crashed into Russia? Strong enough that its explosive entry into our atmosphere was detected almost 6,000 miles away in Lilburn, Ga., by infrasound sensors – a full 10 hours after the meteor’s explosion.
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Pollution Doesn’t Change the Rate of Cloud Droplet Formation, Study Shows


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The presence of oily organic materials on atmospheric particles doesn't slow the formation of droplets that form clouds.
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Contact: John Toon

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