Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

El Niño played a key role in Pacific Marine Heatwave, potentially also climate change


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The 2014-2015 marine heatwave – often referred to as the “warm blob” – had its origins in weather patterns that started in late 2013.
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The 2014-2015 marine heatwave – often referred to as the “warm blob” – had its origins in weather patterns that started in late 2013.

 

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Evolution of the North Pacific Warm Anomaly 2014−2015

Undergrads Help Save Money and Reduce Georgia Tech’s Carbon Dioxide Emissions


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Roof-retrofitting plan to reduce a building’s energy demand was a course project
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Roof-retrofitting plan to reduce a building’s energy demand was a course project

 

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The “Rays the Roof” group presented their project last spring in the Ford ES&T building. Pictured from left to right: Rosenbaum, Snyder, Ploussard, Hamilton, and Aggarwal. Photo courtesy of Janet Ploussard.

Georgia Tech Scientist Britney Schmidt Named to Planetary Society’s Board of Directors


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College of Sciences assistant professor joins “Star Trek: Voyager” actor Robert Picardo, Bill Nye The Science Guy, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson
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College of Sciences assistant professor joins “Star Trek: Voyager” actor Robert Picardo, Bill Nye The Science Guy, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson

Britney Schmidt

A veteran of Antarctic fieldwork, Britney Schmidt is keenly interested in the habitability of icy worlds to search for life beyond Earth.Photo by Peter Kimball

EAS Graduate Students Win Fellowships to Take Their Research Outside Tech


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Awards enable Ph.D. students to broaden their research experience.
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Jacob Buffo

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Tiegan Hobbs on location for her research in Costa Rica

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George McDonald

Computer Simulations Shed Light on the Milky Way's Missing Red Giants


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Simulations provide test of why the center of the Milky Way has no visible older stars
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As the star pummels the disk, it develops a bow shock ahead of the star and a cometary tail behind it. The tail is essentially the gas that is stripped from the star as it passes through and loses a portion of its overall mass.

Simulations provide test of why the center of the Milky Way has no visible older stars

Researchers Discover Fate of Melting Glacial Ice


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Over the past several decades, scientists have observed a significant increase in the melting of glacial land ice on the island of Greenland, spurring concerns about global sea level rise and the long-term effects of atmospheric warming. What has been less clear, however, is what happens to this meltwater once it enters the ocean.
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Greenland meltwater

A team from Rutgers University and the University of Georgia, led by Asa Rennermalm of Rutgers, measures meltwater runoff from the ice sheet margin in Greenland during summer 2013 (photo by Thomas Mote, UGA).

El Nino wreaking havoc on coral reef


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Kim Cobb, of School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, interviewed on the Today Show on April 23 about coral reefs dying because of El Nino
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Kim Cobb, of School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, interviewed on the Today Show on April 23 about coral reefs dying because of El Nino.

http://www.today.com/video/el-nino-wreaking-havoc-on-coral-reef-672309827920

The Cozier the Better for Bubbles Inside Powerful Volcanoes


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Study examines paths of vapor bubbles inside volcanoes and how they affect eruptions
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How did the eruptions of Katmai, Taupo and Santorini grow into a massive blast that spewed fine ash, sulfur and crystal-poor magma into the atmosphere? New research from Georgia Institute of Technology and Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zurich (ETH) suggests they occurred due in part to how light vapor bubbles migrate and accumulate in some parts of shallow volcanic chambers. The findings are published in the most recent issue of Nature.

The Largest Coral Atoll In The World Lost 80 Percent Of Its Coral To Bleaching


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Over the past two weeks, a team of researchers led by Julia Baum, a biologist at the University of Victoria and Kim Cobb, a climate scientist at Georgia Tech, has been stationed at Kiritimati, and via hundreds of dives they have taken comprehensive measurements of the reef’s health, or lack thereof in this case.
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Over the past two weeks, a team of researchers led by Julia Baum, a biologist at the University of Victoria and Kim Cobb, a climate scientist at Georgia Tech, has been stationed at Kiritimati, and via hundreds of dives they have taken comprehensive measurements of the reef’s health, or lack thereof in this case.

Read more in this Think Progress story.

Why dead coral reefs could mark the beginning of ‘dangerous’ climate change


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The island of Kiritimati is one of the world’s most remote places — one of several dozen atolls making up the tiny island nation of Kiribati, a speck in the Pacific Ocean more than a thousand miles south of Hawaii. But, isolated as it is, news of its devastated coral is turning heads around the world. A recent expedition has revealed that the reefs around Kiritimati have suffered a catastrophic mass die-off — an event that epitomizes what may be an ugly truth about the ability of coral reefs around the world to adapt to the growing threat of climate change.

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