Biology

Study in 'Science' finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifers

Published in

News thumb: 
A study in Science may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground.
yes

Written by Argonne National Labs

A study published in Science by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and co-authored by Georgia Tech may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground. This dance affects groundwater quality, the fate of contaminants in the ground and the emerging science of carbon sequestration.

Study of animal urination could lead to better-engineered products

Published in

News thumb: 
Despite a wide range of bladder sizes, all animals more than 6 pounds urinate in the same time span.
yes

Sir Isaac Newton probably wasn’t thinking about how animals urinate when he was developing his laws of gravity. But they are connected – by the urethra, to be specific.

How red tide knocks out its competition

Published in

News thumb: 
New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables – but doesn’t kill – other species of algae.
yes

New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables – but doesn’t kill – other species of algae. The study shows how chemical signaling between algae can trigger big changes in the marine ecosystem.

Evolution in Species May Reverse Predator-Prey Population Cycles

Published in

News thumb: 
Co-evolution in species may reverse traditional predator-prey population cycles, creating the appearance that prey are eating the predators.
yes

Populations of predators and their prey usually follow predictable cycles. When the number of prey increases, perhaps as their food supply becomes more abundant, predator populations also grow.

When the predator population becomes too large, however, the prey population often plummets, leaving too little food for the predators, whose population also then crashes. This canonical view of predator-prey relationships was first identified by mathematical biologists Alfred Lotka and Vito Volterra in the 1920s and 1930s.

Seeing Double: New Study Explains Evolution of Duplicate Genes

Published in

News thumb: 
A process called DNA methylation can shield duplicate genes from being removed from the genome during natural selection.
yes

Share

Fish From Acidic Ocean Waters Less Able to Smell Predators

Published in

News thumb: 
Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.
yes

Share

SURA Honors Georgia Tech Professor as Distinguished Scientist

Published in

News thumb: 
Jeff Skolnick awarded for fostering excellence in scientific research.
yes

Share

Unusual Mechanism of DNA Synthesis Could Explain Genetic Mutations

Published in

News thumb: 
Researchers have discovered how cells repair a potentially devastating kind of DNA damage.
yes

Share

Welcome to Tech, Now Go Away

Published in

News thumb: 
Biology senior Bibi Garcia broadened her horizons with two study abroad trips while attending Georgia Tech.
yes

Share

Research Shows Influence of Temporal Niches in Maintaining Biodiversity

Published in

News thumb: 
Researchers have shown that temporal niches are important to maintaining biodiversity in natural systems.
yes

Share

Syndicate content



©2011 Georgia Tech College of Sciences :: 225 North Ave, Suite 201, Atlanta, Ga., 30332-0365