Biology

Polluted Dust Can Impact Ocean Life Thousands of Miles Away, Study Says

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A new modeling study conducted by researchers in Georgia Tech shows that for decades, air pollution drifting from East Asia out over the world’s largest ocean has contributed to oxygen levels falling in tropical waters thousands of miles away.
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Taka Ito

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Pollution-related Oxygen Loss in Tropical Pacific Ocean

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Athanasios Nene

Center Stage: Andrew Chetcuti Seamlessly Melds Academics and Athletics

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After graduation, the biology major heads to Brazil to compete in the 2016 Olympics and then to graduate school.
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A KEY ROLE FOR MICROBES IN OIL SPILLS

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In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon blowout, the findings of basic research will help better address future disasters.
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Freshmen Forging the Future: Caroline Zabinski, Biology

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At Georgia Tech, Caroline is combining biology and engineering, with an ultimate goal of creating things with meaningful and lasting impact on the environment.
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Crab Shell Signaling Helps Control the Many Faces of Cholera, Study Shows

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A new study shows the diversity and resourcefulness of Vibrio cholerae, the organism behind the disease cholera.
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Lachance Lab receives NIH funding to study the genetics of prostate cancer in African men

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Lachance Lab receives NIH funding to study the genetics of prostate cancer in African men
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Extraterrestrial Life May Be Ubiquitous, Georgia Tech Research Suggests

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Where proteins exist, study finds, biochemistry can take place, making life possible
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An Animal That “Flies” through the Ocean

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Georgia Institute of Technology researchers went to the Pacific Ocean to scoop up hundreds of the 3-millimeter zooplankton snails (sea butterflies or pteropods) and then used high-speed cameras to watch how they move. They found that sea butterflies don’t paddle like most small water animals. Instead, they’re like flying insects, flapping their wings to produce lift and propel them through the water.
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It turns out that the sea butterfly (Limacina helicina), a zooplankton snail that lives in cold oceans, lives up to its name. Georgia Institute of Technology researchers went to the Pacific Ocean to scoop up hundreds of the 3-millimeter marine mollusks (pteropods) and then used high-speed cameras to watch how they move. They found that sea butterflies don’t paddle like most small water animals. Instead, they’re like flying insects, flapping their wings to produce lift and propel them through the water.

Looking Beyond the Structure

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Genetics study shows a burden of rare mutations affecting how our genes are used
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Study Shows Large Variability in Abundance of Viruses that Infect Ocean Microorganisms

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Marine microorganisms play a critical role in capturing atmospheric carbon, but a new study finds much less certainty than previously believed about the populations of the viruses that infect these important organisms.
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Viruses infect more than humans or plants. For microorganisms in the oceans – including those that capture half of the carbon taken out of the atmosphere every day – viruses are a major threat. But a paper published January 25 in the journal Nature Microbiology shows that there’s much less certainty about the size of these viral populations than scientists had long believed.

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